Face masks to decoy t-shirts: The rise of anti-surveillance …

Emily Roderick, 23, and her cohorts in “The Dazzle Club” walked around the British capital last week with blue, red and black stripes painted across their faces in an effort to escape the watchful eye of facial-recognition cameras.

From sunglasses to face masks, numerous wearable devices promising a veil of anonymity are making their way into the mainstream, said Henry Navarro Delgado, an art and fashion professor at Canada’s Ryerson University.

“If someone steals your credit card, you can cancel it and get a new one … (but) most of us are not going to do plastic surgery to rearrange our identity,”

CONTINUE READING at LAMESTREAM MEDIA — Face masks to decoy t-shirts: The rise of anti-surveillance …

IRS To Track Taxpayer Behavior, Movements Through Phones – Nextgov

When taxpayers use online systems, the IRS really wants to make sure the people accessing information are who they say they are.

“BioCatch collects behavioral metrics—i.e., left/right handedness, pressure—while a user is interacting with eAuth without impacting user experience and establishes a profile for the user,” IRS contracting officers wrote in the statement of work. “Once this profile is established, this data is used to detect fraud on subsequent login attempts and to prevent account takeover during the user’s session.”

… BioCatch was selected for its behavioral biometrics and fraud reduction capabilities to be tested with eAuth.”

CONTINUE READING at NextGov.com — IRS Testing Behavioral Analytics to Verify Online Users – Nextgov

Secret F.B.I. Subpoenas Scoop Up Personal Data From Scores of Companies – ENM NEWS

After a series of court rulings found that the gag orders violated First Amendment protections, Congress enacted the review requirements.

The documents obtained through the lawsuit include the number of orders reviewed, as well as redacted copies of 751 letters from the F.B.I. informing companies and organizations their gag orders had been lifted. These so-called termination letters do not reveal the contents of the original national security letters, but indicate which entities received them.

Because so few gag orders have been reviewed and rescinded, it isn’t possible to say whether the companies that received the most termination letters also received the most national security letters. But given the overall secrecy around the program, the termination letters offer a rare glimpse into these subpoenas.

“That’s the problem with the Freedom Act: It procedurally pretended to solve the problem,” he said. “But the whole structure of this involves presumption in favor of the government for perpetual sealing.”

CONTINUE READING at enmNews.com — Secret F.B.I. Subpoenas Scoop Up Personal Data From Scores of Companies – ENM NEWS

Two Secretive Israeli Companies Reportedly Bugged The US Telecommunications Grid For The NSA – Business Insider

The newest information regarding the NSA domestic spying scandal raises an important question: If America’s tech giants didn’t ‘participate knowingly’ in the dragnet of electronic communication, how does the NSA get all of their data?

One theory: the NSA hired two secretive Israeli companies to wiretap the U.S. telecommunications network.

In April 2012 Wired’s James Bamford — author of the book “ The Shadow Factory: The NSA from 9/11 to the Eavesdropping on America” — reported that two companies with extensive links to Israel’s intelligence service provided hardware and software to wiretap the U.S. telecommunications network for the National Security Agency (NSA).

By doing so, this would imply, companies like Facebook and Google don’t have to explicitly provide the NSA with access to their servers because major Internet Service Providers (ISPs) such as AT&T and Verizon already allows the U.S. signals intelligence agency to eavesdrop on all of their data anyway.

CONTINUE READING at BusinessInsider.com — Israelis Bugged The US For The NSA – Business Insider

Gov’t Collects Almost Everything About Everyone Entering USA… -Nextgov

Customs and Border Protection collects a wealth of information through the technologies deployed at the ports of entry, all of which is stored in a master crossing record the agency keeps on every individual who enters the country.

That record contains information gathered at every crossing: the time, date and port of the crossing, the information taken from their travel documents, photos and data collected on their belongings and vehicles, and determinations made by customs officers throughout the process. For non-U.S. citizens, this also means biometric data, such as photos and fingerprints.

That record also includes data culled from a variety of federal databases and sources.

CONTINUE READING at NextGov.com — An Inside Look at All the Data CBP Collects About Everyone Crossing U.S. Borders – Nextgov

CIA Developing Long-Range Face-Scanning Capability – Nextgov

The intelligence community is working to build biometric identification systems that can single out individuals from hundreds of yards away or more…

Ultimately, the tech would let spy agencies rapidly identify people using cameras deployed on far off rooftops and unmanned aircraft, according to the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, the research arm for the CIA and other intelligence agencies.

CONTINUE READING at NextGov.com  — The Intelligence Community is Exploring Long-Range Biometric Identification  – Nextgov

DOJ files civil suit against Edward Snowden over new memoir | Fox News

Snowden writes in the book that his seven years working for the NSA and CIA led him to conclude the U.S. intelligence community “hacked the Constitution” and put everyone’s liberty at risk and that he had no choice but to turn to journalists to reveal it to the world.

“I realized that I was crazy to have imagined that the Supreme Court, or Congress, or President Obama, seeking to distance his administration from President George W. Bush’s, would ever hold the IC [intelligence community] legally responsible — for anything,” he writes.

 

CONTINUE READING at LAMESTREAM MEDIA — DOJ files civil suit against Edward Snowden over new memoir | Fox News